July 2017 Newsletter

Floral Trends - Issue 88

#SlowFlowersSummit 2017 in Seattle is a Hit

By Kit Wertz

#flowersonmyhead Kit Wertz Flower Duet. Flowers by Mud Baron

Mud Baron’s Flow­ers On My Head at the Slow Flow­ers Sum­mit in Seat­tle on Sun­day, July 2, 2017. Self­ie by Kit — assist­ed by the #flow­er­son­y­our­head guru, Mud Baron.

I wrote in last month’s newslet­ter about the first Slow Flow­ers Sum­mit in Seat­tle put on by the cham­pi­on of local flower farm­ers every­where, Debra Prinz­ing. Because of the won­der­ful gen­eros­i­ty of my sis­ter and busi­ness part­ner, I was able to attend the fab­u­lous one-day flo­ral event.

It was a whirl­wind trip to Seat­tle, but I man­aged to fit in an ear­ly morn­ing hike to Pike Place Mar­ket for a few yum­my donuts and a few equal­ly yum­my flo­ral bou­quets.

Then, I was off to the Sum­mit held at the SURF Incu­ba­tor, a Seat­tle pro­fes­sion­al facil­i­ty that sup­ports star­tups, entre­pre­neurs and larg­er com­pa­nies look­ing for office space or meet­ing space in Seat­tle.

First…a Visit to Pike Place Market

Pike Place Florals

Local farms sell flo­ral bou­quets at Pike Place in Seat­tle. Pho­to by Kit Wertz

Sweet Peas at Pike Place

Sweet Peas for $5 a bunch. Fra­grant and pret­ty. Known as “del­i­cate plea­sures” in the Vic­to­ri­an lan­guage of flow­ers accord­ing to Tere­sa Sabankaya of Bon­ny Doon Gar­den Com­pa­ny. Pho­to by Kit Wertz

Flower bouquet Seattle

I bought this lit­tle bou­quet of sweet peas, bach­e­lor but­tons, cal­en­du­las, peonies and snap­drag­ons for my hotel room. I left it with my cash tip for the house­keep­er to enjoy! Pho­to by Kit Wertz.

Celebrating American Flowers Week

The inau­gur­al Slow Flow­ers Sum­mit was deemed a TED talk for flower lovers. I’ve lis­tened to many TED talks and have been inspired often. This day of flower talks informed me on a mul­ti­tude of flo­ral fronts.

By meet­ing peony and dahlia farm­ers from Alas­ka and hav­ing din­ner with the gar­den edi­tor of Bet­ter Homes & Gar­dens, I was inspired to ven­ture out of my South­ern Cal­i­for­nia bub­ble more often.

The theme and mis­sion of the sum­mit were to “Inquire. Inform. Include. Insti­gate. Inspire.” Here is what I took from the love­ly day of lis­ten­ing, meet­ing and talk­ing with flower lovers from all walks of life.

The mas­ter of cer­e­monies for the Sum­mit was James Baggett, the gar­den edi­tor of Bet­ter Homes & Gar­dens. He has been a gar­den edi­tor and writer for more than 20 years. James added a love­ly per­son­al feel to the day and in addi­tion to intro­duc­ing each speak­er and adding won­der­ful anec­dotes of his trav­els and encoun­ters with flower and gar­den icons through­out his life.

The SUMMIT marked the 10-year anniver­sary of Flower Con­fi­den­tial with a keynote pre­sen­ta­tion by New York Times best­selling author Amy Stew­art.

CHANTAL AIDA GORDONThe Hor­tic­ult

LESLIE BENNETTPine House Edi­ble Gar­dens

RIZ REYESRHR Hor­ti­cul­ture

NICOLE CORDIER WAHLQUISTGrace Flow­ers Hawaii

TERESA SABANKAYA, Bon­ny Doon Gar­den Com­pa­ny

EMILY ELLEN ANDERSONLola+Creative

LISA WAUD, POT + BOX, Flower House, and Detroit Flower Week

Inquire: Gather and share

I think the main mes­sage for the entire day was to keep com­mu­ni­ca­tions lines open. Share with fel­low design­ers the best resources and solu­tions to dai­ly prob­lems and work with local sup­pli­ers and grow­ers as much as pos­si­ble.

#slowflowerssummit dahliaInform: Learn about resources

Amy Stewart’s keynote mes­sage includ­ed the idea to see all sides of a sit­u­a­tion. The flower busi­ness is glob­al. Casey pur­chased flow­ers around the world when she worked on a cruise ship and had to cre­ate the flo­ral designs for the ship. Some of these grow­ers sell out­side of their coun­tries. This pro­vides a good life for the work­ers and grow­ers of these coun­tries. My limo dri­ver from my hotel in Seat­tle to the air­port was from Ethiopia and his Aunt hap­pened to be a flower grow­er in that coun­try. We talked about the ros­es she grows and exports to Europe.

This sum­mit was about sup­port­ing local­ly grown flow­ers in Amer­i­ca and I real­ly want to sup­port my local grow­ers as much as pos­si­ble and edu­cate the pub­lic about the Amer­i­can Grown Flower label.  In my state, the CAGROWN label can be found on flower wrap­pers to show their point of ori­gin.

On the flip­side, I also agree with the thought that peo­ple who live in poor coun­tries deserve a good life. This was a part of Amy’s mes­sage which real­ly res­onat­ed with me.

While we are brand ambas­sadors and advo­cates for local­ly grown flow­ers and plants, it would be hyp­o­crit­i­cal for me not to admit that we still source flow­ers from around the world when nec­es­sary. We make it our mis­sion to edu­cate our stu­dents and cus­tomers of the ben­e­fits of sea­son­al­ly, local­ly grown flow­ers. I am grate­ful today that I have an option to buy peonies from Alas­ka for my bride next week where as before, I might have had to pur­chase from a Euro­pean coun­try. If more farm­ers start farm­ing close to home, I can do more of that for my clients.

Include: Include people from a variety of demographics into the flower business

The pan­el about inclu­sive­ness regard­ing peo­ple of all races in the flower indus­try was infor­ma­tive in that it alert­ed the audi­ence of the need to look at the flower busi­ness as an open oppor­tu­ni­ty for all. At Flower Duet, our class­es are filled with peo­ple from all walks of life. We have peo­ple from dif­fer­ent races and cul­tures, ages 5 to 95. Casey and I feel it’s impor­tant to teach flower arrang­ing as a life skill. It’s some­thing one can turn into a busi­ness, treat as a fundrais­ing oppor­tu­ni­ty and bright­en one’s life for­ev­er.

Peonies! #slowflowerssummittInstigate: Turn words into action

It seemed to me as I met many of the atten­dees through­out the day, that most every­one in the audi­ence is a pur­vey­or or sup­pli­er of local­ly grown flow­ers and pro­duce. What I think this part of the mis­sion state­ment means is that there is a bal­anced way to edu­cate oth­ers on the impor­tance of buy­ing flow­ers from your local grow­er. I need to reach out to some of our local farm­ers and build more direct rela­tion­ships.

We rely heav­i­ly on the won­der­ful whole­salers of the Los Ange­les Flo­ral Dis­trict and they are great to show me the local­ly grown prod­ucts, but after this sum­mit, I see a huge val­ue in get­ting to know my local grow­ers. We have per­son­al rela­tion­ships with the grow­ers of our suc­cu­lents, ferns, land­scape plants, Tilland­sias and green­ery from grow­ers in our own town of Tor­rance. Now, we will keep build­ing more rela­tion­ships!

Inspire: Be creative and inspire others

The day was a series of speak­ers with side activ­i­ties includ­ing adding flow­ers to an eco-friend­ly flower wall by the team of Lola+Creative or hav­ing flow­ers on your head by the one and only Mud Baron of Muir Ranch CSA.

The cre­ativ­i­ty of these two dif­fer­ent pro­duc­ers of flo­ral art is tru­ly inspir­ing and I look for­ward to being inspired by their work in the months to come.

When I arrived, I received a fun swag bag full of seed cat­a­logs and mag­a­zines and a glass bud vase made in the USA by Syn­di­cate Sales, Inc.

Sunflowers for the Slow Flowers Summit

The wel­come for atten­dees of the Slow Flow­ers Sum­mit in Seat­tle. Local­ly grown Sun­flow­ers came from the Seat­tle Grow­ers Mar­ket.

#slowflowerssummit bouquet

One of the many flo­ral designs made by the speak­ers and vol­un­teers for the Slow Flow­ers Sum­mit. All flow­ers from the Seat­tle Grow­ers Mar­ket. Pho­to by Kit Wertz

Debra Prinzing welcomes attendees for the Slow Flowers Summit

Debra Prinz­ing was the insti­ga­tor in chief for the day! She put togeth­er the entire event! She is tru­ly inspir­ing. Pho­to by Kit Wertz

Amy Stewart, Author and Journalist at Slow Flowers Summit

New York Times best­selling author Amy Stew­art spoke about her book, “Flower Con­fi­den­tial” on the 10-year anniver­sary of its pub­lish­ing in a keynote speech enti­tled, “Where we’ve come from; Where we’re head­ing.”

Lola+Creative flower wall at the #slowflowerssummit

There are three amaz­ing facts about this flower wall. 1 — About 50 dif­fer­ent peo­ple designed it by adding flow­ers through­out the day dur­ing the sum­mit breaks. Look at how amaz­ing­ly cohe­sive it looks? 2 — All the flow­ers are Amer­i­can Grown flow­ers from Seat­tle to Alas­ka! 3 — This flower wall con­tains no flo­ral foam. It is made with sphag­num moss to keep the flower fresh! Wall by Lola+Creative. Pho­to by Kit Wertz

Jason Chen and Kit Wertz

I was so excit­ed to meet up with my friend Jason Chen of jcbotanicaldesigns.com! He was our vol­un­teer design­er with us for The Field to Vase din­ner which we designed in Carls­bad at The Flower Fields in April of 2016. Self­ie by Kit Wertz

#slowflowerssummit speakers from 2017

Here is a great shot of all the speak­ers from the 2017 #slowflow­erssum­mit. From left to right: James Baggett, Riz Reyes, Nicole Cordier Wahlquist, Chan­tal Aida Gor­don, Emi­ly Ellen Ander­son, Tere­sa Sabankaya, Amy Stew­art, Debra Prinz­ing, Lisa Waud and Leslie Ben­nett.

June Brides by Flower Duet

To quote one of our favorite musi­cals, Sev­en Brides for Sev­en Broth­ers, “They say when you mar­ry in June, you’re a bride all your life.”

Many clients have mar­ried this past June and here are a few images from recent wed­dings and wed­ding-inspired designs to enjoy in the hot month of July.

Red & White Tropical Wedding at Los Verdes Golf Course

This love­ly pho­to cap­tured by Figlewicz Pho­tog­ra­phy high­lights a fresh trop­i­cal wed­ding with pops of bright red and white flow­ers.

We designed a match­ing duo of trop­i­cal flo­ral sprays for the cer­e­mo­ny which fea­tured large Mon­stera leaves and palm fronds as well as white Den­dro­bi­um orchids.

Tropical floral sprays for an ocean side wedding.

Trop­i­cal foliage flo­ral sprays for an ocean-view wed­ding in Palos Verdes. Pho­to by Casey Schwartz.

White & Dusty Gray Wedding

This love­ly pho­to by our friends Miki & Son­ja Pho­tog­ra­phy cap­tures the won­der­ful cama­raderie between a bride and her besties. The white ros­es, hydrangea, and peonies were high­light­ed by the dusty miller to accent the beau­ti­ful dress­es and ladies.

Always sur­round your­self with a girl tribe of love and sup­port💖 . Pho­to by @mikiandsonja

A post shared by Events by Hol­ly Gray (@eventsbyhollygray) on

Coral Wedding Flowers and Garlands

We designed a pret­ty wed­ding with gray leaves in the form of euca­lyp­tus and shades of coral ros­es for a dear friend with whom we worked for many years at The Hunt­ing­ton Library. Team­ing up with Hon­ey­fitz Events, the space at Calami­gos Ranch was a fan­tas­tic loca­tion for a won­der­ful cou­ple. Here are a few pho­tos from that wed­ding in June and spe­cial thanks to Julie, Stu and Shari who helped us on the install!

CAGrown garland

Cal­i­for­nia grown gar­land with large-head­ed ros­es adorns this long table for the coral-themed wed­ding. Pho­to by Kit Wertz

Rounded white and green centerpiece with coral roses.

Sil­ver Dol­lar Euca­lyp­tus high­lights this round­ed cen­ter­piece with coral and pink ros­es. Pho­to by Kit Wertz.

Garland for sweetheart table.

Sweet­heart wed­ding recep­tion table with gar­land. Pho­to by Kit Wertz

Coffee Table garland.

Extra gar­land is draped on the low cof­fee table for the out­door seat­ing at the wed­ding. Pho­to by Kit Wertz.

Styled Shoot Inspiration — Americana Flowers

Anoth­er view of a styled shoot we did for a mag­a­zine with Natal­ie Good.

Pink and Lavender Wedding

This wed­ding palette was so soft and airy and beau­ti­ful­ly cap­tured by Koman Pho­tog­ra­phy.

Flo­rals @flowerduetla
Plan­ning @eventsbyhollygray
Venue & Rentals @m_gardens

I love when the flow­ers match the throw pil­lows. @flowerduetla @eventsbyhollygray @m_gardens #fin­ish­with­flow­ers #sis­ter­biz

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flowerduet.com bridal bouquet

Flower Duet Wed­ding cou­ple — Koman Pho­tog­ra­phy

Flower Duet Pink Bridesmaids

Pret­ty pink brides­maids — Koman Pho­tog­ra­phy

Flower Duet Pink Wedding party photo

Wed­ding par­ty of pink brides­maids with laven­der blos­soms. Koman Pho­tog­ra­phy

Draping Diva?

We are often asked by clients and plan­ners to add fab­ric to help soft­en the struc­ture and frame the cou­ple for a cer­e­mo­ny or sweet­heart table. Some­times we elect to cre­ate a whim­si­cal look that is asym­met­ri­cal or the­atri­cal. Here are a few drapes from a recent wed­ding where the cater­ing man­ag­er at the venue called Casey a “Drap­ing Diva.”

Ceremony draping by Flower Duet with floral sprays

Sweetheart table draping by Flower Duet with floral sprays

More June Weddings

Coral-colored centerpieces for a garden wedding by Flower Duet.

Coral-col­ored cen­ter­pieces for a gar­den wed­ding by Flower Duet.

Yellow peony bridal bouquet by Flower Duet.

Yel­low peonies are paired with bur­gundy dahlias and yel­low pro­tea in this deeply col­ored June bou­quet. Pho­to by Kit Wertz

 

Flower Duet peony centerpiece with air plants

Pink peonies and a green air­plant are the stars in this green­ery based wed­ding cen­ter­piece. Pho­to by Casey Schwartz.

Photo by Casey Schwartz. White Hydrangea and white rose centerpieces.

White ros­es and white hydrange are wait­ing to be placed on the tables.

Flower Workshops from June

We love our stu­dents. We taught a series of class­es focused on ros­es for June. Start­ing at The Hunt­ing­ton Library, Art Col­lec­tions and Botan­i­cal Gar­dens in San Mari­no, we taught a children’s and adult’s class two dif­fer­ent arrange­ments fea­tur­ing ros­es.

Flower Duet is hon­ored and pleased to be cel­e­brat­ing its 10th Anniver­sary of teach­ing the flo­ral design class­es at The Hunt­ing­ton and have secured dates well into 2018 for the 11th year!

Will in the Huntington Herb Garden.

Casey’s son Will was Kit’s assis­tant for the Hunt­ing­ton class­es and after we fin­ished, we strolled through the Chi­nese, Japan­ese and herb gar­dens. Here, Will is look­ing at a lizard we spot­ted in the Herb Gar­den. Pho­to by Kit Wertz

Kids Rose Class Flower Arranging with Flower Duet at The Huntington Library.

In our children’s class for ages 7–12, we taught this posy in a mason jar with ros­es, lark­spur, oregano, ama­ran­thus, Rus­cus and rose­mary. Pho­to by Kit Wertz.

Adult flower arranging classes Los Angeles by Flower Duet Roses

For the adult class, we high­light­ed the new­ly cre­at­ed cof­fee-col­ored rose and paired it with pale pink ros­es and spray ros­es as well as Lark­spur, ama­ran­thus, rose­mary and two types of Rus­cus. Pho­to by Kit Wertz.

 

Rose vase flower class by Flower Duet.

Casey’s son Sam (in orange) and his Fri­day park play crew spent an after­noon at the stu­dio learn­ing to arrange car­na­tions in pots. Pho­to by Casey Schwartz

Kids Flower Arranging

 

Kids Flower arranging - Flower Duet

The Fri­day Park Crew had a les­son in flower arrang­ing at our stu­dio in June. After the kids made their flow­ers and were play­ing ball games out­side, the moms were able to make flow­ers, too! Pho­to by Casey Schwartz

Magazine Recommendation: Better Homes & Gardens

Each month we offer a book to read about flower arrang­ing or gar­den­ing or both! This month, we can cov­er all bases with a mag­a­zine sub­scrip­tion rec­om­men­da­tion.

It’s not often you get to meet your heroes, but in the past year, I’ve met the gar­den edi­tors from my two favorite gar­den mag­a­zines!

Last week­end, I had the plea­sure of din­ing with James Baggett, the gar­den edi­tor for Bet­ter Homes & Gar­dens. It was love­ly to hear his sto­ries about gar­dens in places I know and in places I have yet to vis­it.

We shared books we like and flow­ers we like over a nice meal in Seat­tle. But, even if I had not met the gar­den edi­tor, I would still rec­om­mend this fan­tas­tic mag­a­zine! I look for­ward to receiv­ing it each month and devour­ing the pages of home design ideas, gar­den ideas, and recipes.

In July’s issue, Debra Prinz­ing (of Slow Flow­ers fame) wrote an arti­cle on one of the guest speak­ers at the Slow Flow­ers Sum­mit, Leslie Ben­nett, own­er of Pine House Edi­ble Gar­dens in Oak­land, Cal­i­for­nia. (See our first sto­ry on this page for more infor­ma­tion on the Sum­mit.)

Leslie Bennett featured in July 2017 BH&G magazine.

Leslie Ben­nett was a speak­er on a pan­el for inclu­sive­ness at the Slow Flow­ers Sum­mit.

It’s excit­ing to open a mag­a­zine and know the peo­ple who put it togeth­er. I hope you enjoy it, too.

Order a sub­scrip­tion online at BHG.com or pick up a copy up at your favorite book­store or news­stand.

Flower Tool: Crowning Glory Floral Spray

It’s July and it’s hot and we live in a desert.

Flow­ers dry out through their blooms even when they are in a full vase of water.

One way to keep them from dry­ing out is to spray com­plet­ed designs lib­er­al­ly with Crown­ing Glo­ry Flo­ral Spray.

This prod­uct is made for the com­mer­cial flower indus­try and is a must for flow­ers in heat and for flow­ers that will be out of water for hours at a time like cor­sages, bou­ton­nieres and bridal bou­quets.

  • Use it at 100% strength.
  • Spray until the drops are vis­i­ble on all the blooms in a bou­quet.
  • Be lib­er­al with the appli­ca­tion.

Here is what the prod­uct line says about its use:

Clear Crown­ing Glo­ry® solu­tion keeps arrange­ments fresh­er and cus­tomers sat­is­fied. This easy to apply liq­uid shield holds in mois­ture which reduces water loss, keep­ing flow­ers more vibrant. Often used in del­i­cate tra­di­tion­al wed­ding flow­ers, such as gar­de­nias, stephan­otis, ros­es, and lilies, where the arrange­ments are in no or lit­tle water, it’s the final hydrat­ing step.

Clear Crown­ing Glo­ry® solu­tion can be used by all lev­els of the flo­ral indus­try includ­ing Grow­ers, Whole­salers, Bou­quet Mak­ers, and Retail Florists.

Clear Crown­ing Glo­ry® solu­tion is ready to use; no mix­ing or dilut­ing required. Spray dries to a clear fin­ish with no residue.”

The pop­u­lar flo­ral blog Flir­ty Fleurs did a great test. Check out their “The Test­ing of Crown­ing Glo­ry” post. You will be amazed!

Pur­chase at your local whole­sale flo­ral sup­pli­er or online.